Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Davidsgjá – Ice diving next to a volcano in Iceland

Update: If you are considering a trip to Iceland after reading this, you might want to check out my Iceland travel guide

Davidsgjá, the fissure of David is one of my favorite dive sites in Iceland. In Þingvallavatn, Iceland’s largest natural lake, the rift extends over several hundred meters and leads the divers to a depth of 15-20m. Whoever is looking for an alternative or an extension for diving in Silfra: This is the place to go.

Scuba diving in Davidsgjá

Davidsgjá, Davids fissure in Iceland’s largest lake

The site is located just ten minutes from Silfra and lies within the lake, where the crystal clear water from the Silfra fissure flows into it. Unfortunately, the water does not remain as clear but is a bit cloudier, depending on wind and weather. Visibility varies between dozens of meters to less than arm’s length.

In the column itself visibility is usually excellent because the cold water here is clear on the ground and the suspended particles accumulate in the warm water over it. So when you arrive at the fissure within the lake, visibility is usally excellent from then on. Those who already dive in Silfra will recognize similarities and important differences: The rocks here are narrower and shorter but they are colored in the same blue which can be found in Silfra.

Scuba diving in Davidsgjá

Scuba diving in Davidsgjá

Here in Davidsgjá, the very same strcit rules to diving apply. This means: One should not dive deeper than 18m. In some places, this is not helpful because the fissure goes to a depth of more than 20m down. There are also some nice swim throughs which one can do here (Warning: Please always stay within your personal limits and dive within your comfort zone!). A cave system like in the National Park is not to be found here.

Another difference is that of a higher probability to see something alive here. While in Silfra  only a few, tiny fish appear, many types of fish are at home  in Davidsgjá. One can find among others, trout and char to the length of 50cm and more. When approached quietly and calm, the fish will be happy to swim a few meters in front of or beside you.

The first time I dove here was on a snowy winterday in April 2014. While the lake itself was nearly completely frozen, we were lucky that the edge of the ice was a few dozen meters away from the shore where we entered. That gave us the opportunity to safely visit the sections under the ice for some quick shenanigans.

At the entrance to the dive site, perfect conditions welcome us: The water is crystal clear, many bright green algae float around and block a the view at some points. Just like in Silfra, fresh glacial water comes from the rocks into the lake all the time here.

Scuba diving in Davidsgjá

Scuba diving in Davidsgjá

We dive in a width of approximately 20-30m and down to a depth of about 15m. Because the dive site is not visited as frequently as others, you can still sometimes find artifacts here. We find old Icelandic coins (Krona, no silver, sorry …) and an old tube of paint which must come from one of the painters who sat here years ago, painting landscape portraits from the lake with the volcano behind it.

As we reach the end of the rift, we see the light blue ice and take a few pictures of us in front of this magnificent backdrop. The water temperature drops below the ice to now 1°C. Everyone is aware that we have to be careful diving only a few feet below the ice edge. Just enough to let some air in your shoes and walk on the ceiling.

Scuba diving in Davidsgjá

 

In the distance I can see the shadows of big trouts. A small group patrols at a safe distance from us under the ice. The animals are about half a meter long and seem huge through the diving mask. However, they remain at a distance and enjoy the tranquility. Davidsgjá is inhabited by a large number of fish, which makes it especially attractive to fishermen and so fishing lines and hooks can be found on the ground regularly.

 

Scuba diving in Davidsgjá

I wonder for a second if one could stand well on the ice and whether the ice edge is stable enough to heave yourself up. I’m doing the math without thinking of the 20kg equipment I carry on my back and so I give up for the time being. A little later I try it with the support of my fully inflated BCD and strong fin strokes from a depth of 2-3m and – voilà – On my stomach I slide gracefully out onto the ice. When I stand up I suddenly remember all the led in my pockets and the heavy cylinder dragging me down. But I’m standing on the edge of the ice sheet and can enjoy the view across the lake and down to my buddies. The ice is stron enough, even around the edge so that we decide to do a giant stride into the lake.

Scuba diving in Davidsgjá

Scuba diving in Davidsgjá

The others are of course also very interested and minutes later all slide on their bellies toward the volcano, just like sea lions in Antarctica. Three are better than one and so the layout of a triple giant stride is formulated as I dive away from the gang to quickly position myself underwater. While descending I quickly count to ten: One, two, thr… and swooosh with a loud crash, the colleagues, accompanied by large chunks of ice crash into the water and I can press the shutter button just in time. A great photo of a great dive!

Scuba diving in Davidsgjá

Scuba diving in Davidsgjá

We slowly swim back towards the exit and still find a single trout on the road. We obviously make her feel uneasy and so she shoots back into the lake, right under us. On the way we find yet more artifacts and also a great place with a simple swim through whom we do not want to miss.

Scuba diving in Davidsgjá

Those who want to dive at Davidsgjá should ideally contact one of the local dive centers. Everyone knows this spot and can take you there, into the lake and around in it. The entry is on a flat area with lots of flat stones and is therefore very comfortable. From there you follow a rope to the fissure, and then you can dive it north or south, the shore is always east of you.

In summer, there is not much to think of. Please be cautious in terms of fishing lines and hooks. Those wishing to take the swim throughs should take a lamp and coordinate with their buddy.

Those who want to dive here in winter should choose days on which the ice is no longer over the fissure. Ice diving can quickly become dangerous and you should not do it if you don’t have the appropriate training! Please always dive within your limits. Have fun in Davidsgjá 🙂

Taucher in Silfra, Island

Scuba diving between the continents: Silfra in Iceland

Update: If you are considering a trip to Iceland after reading this, you might want to check out my Iceland travel guide

One part of my multi-day dive tour in Iceland fortunately led me to do two dives to Þingvellir. This historic place is surrounded by four active volcanoes, notably Hrómundartindur, Hengill, Prestahnjúkur and Hrafnabjörg. The valley is part of the Golden Circle of Iceland and is  part of the Unesco World Heritage site as of 2004. Here you can find the place where one of the oldest parliaments in the world took place, since the year 930  Vikings met once y year to discuss and enforce legislation.

The fissure itself is located on the fracture zone between the North American and the Eurasian lithospheric plates (tectonic plates).

This is where earth is literally torn apart.

Silfra

Silfra

Right here, I should experience the most spectacular dive of my young diving career. The idea of coming here came up right after I did my OW in South Africa and googled for the best diving spots in the world. Eight weeks later, I jumped into these crystal clear waters.

Silfra

Silfra

The Silfra fissure runs through the entire National Park and ends in Þingvallavatn lake. In large parts it is filled with soil, but at one point fresh glacial water comes out of the ground after traveling for decades through the lava stone. During this time the water was forced through huge amounts of lava and freed of any suspended solids and impurities. Even though the water is traveling that long and so far from the icy glaciers, it remains at the same temperature as at the beginning of the journey, about 2°C.

Silfra

Silfra

When talking about good visibility in tropical waters, you’re talking about 30, maybe 40 meters. That already feels like a huge range. In Silfra the visibility is more than 130m. The water is so crystal clear that in the moment in which it is deep enough to look up, it is no longer apparent where the water surface actually begins: The space lying below it is reflected perfectly and seamlessly back, so you get the illusion of infinite space in front of you. This place has something infinite, which is so breathtaking that you start wondering where all the bubbles went that were around you before. Until you breathe again.

Silfra

Silfra

But back to the beginning: We drive over the back of the North American plate into the Valley of the parliament and stop briefly at a tourist information to put on the undergarments. From here, we continue to the entry point that is called „toilet“ by the locals – I will refrain from asking why. We put on our diving suits very quickly and continue towards the entry point where a steel ladder guides the divers into the fissure. We pull the gloves on, spit in the mask and start the cameras.

Silfra

Silfra

When entering, the air hisses from the diving suits and one after the other feet, legs, stomach and chest get cold. Only the air in the vest is holding us afloat now. I eagerly await for the others to come into the water and do not risk looking down because I want to save this moment for our actual descent. While one after the other enters the water, I take a look at the astonishing rock walls around me. This is where the foundation of earth is, the plates that carry our every square meter of land. Here they come together or move apart.

Silfra

Silfra

When we are all together, we raise our BCD hoses and with every powerful hiss we sink a little deeper, slowly until the cold temperatures cool just our lips and cheeks. The view is cold, blue and breathtaking. Even here, in the small entry pool one will quickly realize how special this dive will be. Even if you still have no idea what is still expected.

The dive starts in a larger pool of about 15m depth. From here it is a few meters along the rift to the south. Over a less deep – max. 1m – section the way leads  into the hall of Silfra. This is also the area with the entrances to the 45m deep caves of Silfra. Large boulders block the way on a regular basis and threaten to collapse at every earthquake. Another reason why it is forbidden to dive into the caves or below 18m.

Silfra

Silfra

After 150-200m you get into the heart of this exceptional dive spot, the Silfra cathedral. Here unfolds the beauty of this place for a length of about 100m and to a depth of more than 20m. Taking one look into the cathedral – where you already clearly see the sand at the end – many divers will actually freeze for a moment because of the sheer wastness of this area. Most pictures of Silfra that  you will find on the internet probably have been taken here.

Silfra

Silfra

At the end of the cathedral, the trail leads one to an underwater beach, where you can turn left into the lagoon of Silfra or to the right were a current will suck you out into the lake. Although there is a bit of a temptation to go right, I decide to follow the group into the lagoon. In here you can also see directly from the entry to the exit point, where a steel ladder helps you get out of the water. The distance is about 120m.

Silfra

Silfra

Overall, I was allowed to experience this amazing place four times, twice during my drysuit speciality course dives and two more times with the tour. I would probably happily cancel every other dive in the tour though, just to be able to dive into the blue infinity again!

Facts about Silfra

  • The Silfra fissure is the real reason why islands such as Iceland and the Azores exist, because they are right on top of it
  • Basically the fissure is  over 65.000km long, it just only surfaces in a few places
  • Not only does it divide the North American and Eurasian but also the South American and African tectonic plates
  • The fissure expands by about 2-3cm every year

In cooperation with Dive.IS.

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Davidsgjá – Eistauchen am Vulkan in Island

Davidsgjá, die Schlucht von David ist einer meiner Lieblingstauchplätze in Island. Im Þingvallavatn See gelegen erstreckt sich die Spalte im See über mehrere hundert Meter und führt den Taucher auf einer Tiefe von 15-20m durch Islands größten natürlichen See. Wer also eine Alternative oder eine Erweiterung zum Tauchen in Silfra sucht ist hier bestens aufgehoben.

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Davidsgjá, Davids Spalte in Islands größtem See

Der Tauchplatz ist nur zehn Minuten von Silfra entfernt und führt einen genau in den See, in welchen das glasklare Wasser aus der Silfraspalte hinein fließt. Leider bleibt das Wasser nicht so glasklar, sondern wird je nach Wind und Wetter etwas trüber. Die Sichtweiten schwanken zwischen dutzenden von Metern bis hin zu weniger als Armlänge.

In der Spalte selbst ist die Sicht meist hervorragend, da das kalte Wasser hier am Boden klar ist und die Schwebeteilchen sich im warmen Wasser darüber sammeln. Wer also einmal an der Schlucht im See angekommen ist, kann abtauchen und die gute Sicht genießen. Wer vorher bereits in Silfra tauchte wird klare Ähnlichkeiten erkennen sowie gravierende Unterschiede: Die Felsen hier sind enger und kürzer aber sie sind in das gleiche, tiefe blau gefärbt welches man auch in Silfra findet.

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Hier in der Davidsgjá gelten außerdem die gleichen, sehr strengen Regeln für Taucher. Das bedeutet: Man darf hier nicht tiefer als 18m tauchen. An einigen Stellen ist das nicht hilfreich da die Felsspalte auf eine Tiefe von mehr als 20m hinunter reicht. Außerdem gibt es hier einige schöne swim throughs welche man hier durchschwimmen darf (Achtung: Bitte immer innerhalb deiner persönlichen Limits und innerhalb deiner Wohlfühlzone tauchen!). Ein Höhlensystem wie das im Nationalpark ist hier nicht zu finden, die Regeln verbieten aber sowieso darin zu tauchen.

Ein weiterer Unterschied ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit hier etwas lebendiges zu sehen (Algen ausgenommen). Während in Silfra nur wenige, klitzekleine Fische wohen sind in Davidsgjá viele groeße Fische zu Hause. Man findet hier unter anderem Forellen und Saiblinge die Längen von guten 50cm erreichen und oft in kleinen Gruppen auftreten. Wer entsprechen ruhig tauche kann bis auf einige cm an die Fische herankommen, im Normalfall schwimmen sie aber fort wenn man innerhalb weniger Meter von ihnen ausatmet.

Ich tauchte hier zum ersten Mal an einem kalten, verschneiten Wintertag im April 2015. Während der See an den meisten Stellen noch komplett zugefroren war, hatten wir Glück und entlang der Spalte lag genau passend für uns die Eiskante, sodass wir zwar sicher abtauchen aber gleichzeitig auch einen kleinen Ausflug unter das Eis wagen konnten.

Am Eingang zum Tauchplatz herrschen traumhafte Bedingungen: Das Wasser ist glasklar und viele grellgrüne Algen schweben umher und versperren einem die Sicht auf die Felswände. Auch hier kommt frisches und kaltes Gletscherwasser aus dem Gestein und fließt entlang der Felsen in den See.

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Wir tauchen auf einer Breite von etwa 20-30m und bis zu einer Tiefe von etwa 15m. Da in Davidsgjá nur selten getaucht wird, finden sich regelmäßig Artefakte zwischen den Steinbrocken an den Seiten und auf dem Boden. Wir finden alte isländische Münzen (Kronen, kein Silber, sorry…) und eine alte Farbtube die von einem der Maler stammen muss die hier vor Jahren Landschaftsportraits vom See mit dem dahinter liegenden Vulkan anfertigten.

Als wir das Ende der Felsspalte erreichen, sehen wir die hellblaue Eisdecke und machen ein paar Fotos von uns vor dieser beeindruckenden Kulisse. Die Wassertemperatur unter dem Eis fällt noch einmal  auf nun 1°C. Jeder ist sich bewusst, dass wir ab hier vorsichtig sein müssen und so tauchen wir nur einige wenige Meter unter die Eiskante. Gerade genug um etwas Luft in die Schuhe zu lassen und an der Decke zu laufen.

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

In der Ferne, im See können wir die Schatten von großen Forellen erkennen. Eine kleine Gruppe die in sicherer Entfernung unter dem Eis patroulliert. Die Tiere sind knapp einen halben Meter lang und wirken durch die Tauchermaske riesig. Sie bleiben allerdings auf Abstand und genießen ihre Ruhe. Davidsgjá wird von einer großen Anzahl von Fischen bewohnt, was diesen Ort besonders interessant für Angler macht und so finden sich am Boden regelmäßig Angerschnüre und Haken.

Ich frage mich, ob man auf dem Eis wohl stehen kann und ob die Eiskante stabil genug ist um sich daran hoch zu hieven. Dabei mache ich die Rechnung vorerst ohne die gut 20kg Equipment die ich auf dem Rücken trage und gebe das Vorhaben vorerst auf. Wenig später versuche ich es mit der Unterstützung meiner voll aufgeblasenen Tarrierweste und kräftigen Flossenschlägen aus einer Tiefe von 2-3m und – et voilà – ich rutsche auf dem Bauch hinaus auf die Eisdecke. Selbst hier wird mit beim Aufstehen bewusst, wie viel Blei ich bei mir habe und wie schwer der Stahlzylinder auf meinem Rücken ist. Aber ich stehe am Rande der Eisplatte und kann die Aussicht über den See und runter zu meinen Buddies genießen. Die Eisplatte hält selbst am Rand und wir entschließen uns einen giant stride zu filmen.

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Die Anderen sind natürlich ebenfalls hoch interessiert und Minuten später rutschen alle auf ihren Bäuchen in Richtung Vulkan, wie Seelöwen in der Antarktis. Drei sind besser als Einer und so wird schnell der Plan von einem triple giant stride formuliert und ich tauche ab um die Bande unter Wasser abzulichten. Während ich zügig herabsinke zähle ich bis Zehn: Eins, Zwei, Dr… und mit einem lauten Krach stürzen die Kollegen, begleitet von großen Eisbrocken in’s Wasser und ich kann gerade noch rechtzeitig den Auslöser betätigen. Ein großartiges Foto von einem großartigen Tauchgang!

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Wir schwimmen langsam zurück in Richtung Ausgang und finden noch eine einzelne Forelle auf dem Weg. Wir sind ihr nicht ganz geheuer und so zischt sie irgendwann unter uns hinweg und hinaus in den See während wir unseren Weg zum Ufer fortsetzen. Unterwegs finden wir noch weitere Artefakte und auch eine tolle Stelle mit einem einfachen swim through den wir uns nicht entgehen lassen.

Tauchen in Davidsgjá

Wer in Davidsgjá tauchen möchte sollte sich idealerweise an eines der lokalen Divecenter wenden. Alle kennen diesen Spot und können euch dorthin bringen, in den See und darin umher führen. Der Einstieg erfolgt an einer flachen Stelle mit vielen Steinen und ist daher sehr komfortabel. Von dort aus folgt ihr einem Seil bis zur Spalte und könnt diese dann nach Norden oder Süden betauchen, das Ufer ist immer östlich von euch.

Im Sommer gibt es hier nicht viel zu beachten. Bitte seid umsichtig im Bezug auf Anglerschnüre und -Haken. Wer die swim throughs machen möchte sollte eine Lampe mitnehmen und sicht mit seinem Buddy koordinieren.

Wer im Winter hier tauchen möchte sollte sich Tage aussuchen an welchen die Eisdecke nicht mehr über der Spalte ist. Eistauchen kann schnell gefährlich werden und wer keine entsprechende Ausbildung hat sollte davon Abstand nehmen! Bitte taucht immer innerhalb eurer Limits. Viel Spaß in Davidsgjá 🙂

Die besten Divespots in Island

Während meiner dreimonatigen Ausbildung zum Divemaster in Island habe ich verschiedene Tauchplätze gesehen und hier ist eine Liste meiner absoluten Lieblings-Divespots zum Tauchen in Island:

Tauchen wo das Leben entstand: Der hydrothermale Schlot Strýtan

 

Tauchen zwischen den tektonischen Platten in Silfra, Island

 

Taucher am Kleifarvatn in IslandTauchen im geothermalen See – Kleifarvatn in Island

 

Tauchen im Nordatlantik bei Garður in Island

Tauchen wo das Leben entstand: Der hydrothermale Schlot Strýtan

Wer taucht will Besonderes sehen. Seien es große Fische, bunte Korallen, glasklares Wasser oder verlorene Schiffswracks. Wer an Tauchen in Island denkt, dem kommen wahrscheinlich Eisberge in den Sinn und wer etwas Recherche betreibt stößt unweigerlich auf Silfra, eine Divesite die immer wieder ganz oben auf den Toplisten der weltweiten Tauchreviere auftaucht.

Wer dem Touristenpfad entkommt, kann im Norden Islands einen Ort finden der einmalig ist auf der Welt. Eine Divesite die ermöglicht, was man sonst nirgends auf diesem Planeten sehen kann. Ein Erlebnis, das einem den Atem stocken lässt, vollkommen egal wie oft der Tauchlehrer einem dies verboten hat…

Dort erheben sich hydrothermale Schlote vom Meeresboden in die Höhe, wo dann geothermal aufgeheiztes Wasser ausströmt. Der Tauchspot besteht aus zwei Kaminen, einem kleinen und einem großen. Der kleine Kamin – Arnarnesstrýtur – befindet sich etwas nördlicher und wird nach einer 4-5 minütigen Bootsfahrt erreicht. Der große Kamin – Strýtan – befindet sich etwas südlich der Tauchbasis und ist nach etwa 5-10 Minuten mit dem Boot erreicht.

Erlendur macht sich fertig zum Tauchen in Strytan

Los geht's: Tauchen in Strytan

Ein letzter Blick zum Boot in Strytan

Tauchen mit Stefania der Wolffish Dame

Arnarnesstrýtur ist unser erster Stop am heutigen Tag und führt uns etwas nördlich der Tauchbasis zu zwei kleinen Kaminen. An diesem Spot finden sich vielfältige Lebewesen der Unterwasserwelt wie Anemonen, Krabben, Quallen und natürlich auch jede Mensche Fische. Neben neugierigen Dorschen findet sich hier insbesondere Stefania, eine Steinbeißer- (Wolffish) Dame und ihre Mitbewohner. Die drei haben am Meeresboden eine WG für Hässliche gegründet, Steinbeißer haben ein Gesicht das nur eine Mutter lieben kann! Dafür sind sie alle sehr zutraulich und freuen sich jedes Mal wenn Erlendur am Seil der Boje entlang in Richtung Meeresboden sinkt. Dann hat er nämlich normalerweise eine Tasche voll Muscheln im Gepäck und Stefania und ihre Buddies essen gerne Muscheln. Heute haben wir keine dabei, alternativ gibt es also ein paar Streicheleinheiten unterm Kinn und am Bauch. Die drei verhalten sich wie Hunde und folgen uns auf Schritt und Tritt um den kleinen Hügel. Mehrmals während dem fast einstündigen Tauchgang werden Stefania & Co. überraschend auftauchen und uns anlächeln und jedes Mal ist es ein kleiner Schock 😉

Wolf Fish Stefania in Strytan

Wolf Fish Stefania in Strytan

Wolf Fish Stefania in Strytan

In Arnarnesstrýtur hat sich um die kleinen Kamine eine Vielzahl von Meeresbewohnern niedergelassen und man fühlt sich offensichtlich sehr wohl in der Nachbarschaft um die hydrothermalen Hügel. Erlendur schwimmt langsam umher und versucht mit seiner neuen Kamera Videos zu sammeln während ich mir die Gegend auf eigene Faust anschaue. Am Anfang ist das relativ langweilig, weil es nicht wirklich viel zu sehen gibt, wenn man nicht weiß wo man suchen muss. Ab und zu bemerkt Erlendur wie ich umher irre, zupft an meiner Flosse und zeigt mir einen weiteren spannenden Punkt an den Kaminen. An einigen Orten strömt heißes Wasser direkt in die Umgebung und man kann den Thermo- und Heliocline deutlich sehen. Das Wasser sieht so ölig aus wie man sich einen Tauchgang in einer überdimensionalen Wanne mit Silikonöl vorstellen würde. Hinter dem Vorhang aus eiskaltem Salz- und kochend heißem Süßwasser erkenne ich Erlendur nur schemenhaft und selbst als er seine Lampe direkt auf micht richtet – im Normalfall vergleichbar mit einem Scheinwerfer bei Nacht – sehe ich nur die Umrisse eines kleinen Lichtzirkels.

Heliocline in Strytan beim Tauchen

Heliocline in Strytan beim Tauchen

Nach etwa 45 Minuten treten wir langsam die Heimreise an. Immer entlang der Ankerschnur in Richtung Boot. Bis zum Stop bei 5m. Mir ist zwischenzeitlich ordentlich kalt geworden, der Tauchcomputer hatte sich irgendwann auf 1°C eingependelt und diese Zahl für den Rest des Tauchgangs nicht mehr losgelassen. Selbst hier an der Oberfläche zeigt das Gerät gerade mal 2 oder 3 Grad an und meine Vorfreude auf das Surface-Intervall wird immer größer. Erlendur hat einen heißen Pool am Tauchcenter und es gibt Stullen mit Käse, Schinken und eine Tafel Ritter Sport.

Während der knappen Stunde Auszeit im Divecenter zeigt Erlendur mir das kleine Museum im oberen Stockwerk. Wir müssen über provisorisch aufgereihte Matratzen klettern, da dieser Tage eine Delegation französischer Kunststudenten hier einquartiert ist. Hier gibt es alles zu sehen, was Erlendur während der letzten Jahre beim Betauchen der Kamine gelernt, gefunden und erschaffen hat. Eine imposante Sammlung von Wissen, Artefakten und Skurrilem gibt einem einen ungefähren Eindruck von der Passion mit welcher der Sohn Bogas diesen Ort erkundet und beschützt. Hier liegen alte Teller aus der weiten Umgebung und weiteres Geschirr. Alte Messer und Bootsutensilien. Es finden sich abgebrochene Ecken der Kamine sowie Fischskellete und Muscheln. Zu allem hat er etwas zu berichten und hinter jedem Artefakt steckt ein kleines Erlebnis und alle zusammen bilden das große Abenteuer des Erlendur Bogason von der Entdeckung und Erforschung Strýtan’s.

Tauchen an den heißen Kaminen von Strýtan

Das ist auch unser nächster Halt: Strýtan. Hier, am größeren der zwei Kamine soll mir das Ausmaß dieser Naturwunder erst wirklich bewusst werden. Der Kamin erhebt sich 55m hoch vom 70m unter der Oberfläche liegenden Meeresboden nach oben. Wir starten in der Mitte des kleinen Berges und schwimmen langsam nach oben während wir den Kamin Meter für Meter erkunden. Als wir starten zeigt mein Tauchcomputer eine Tiefe von 35m an und eine Temperatur von 1°C. Das ist kein Tauchgang für Weicheier und das ist auch kein Tauchgang für Draufgänger. In solchen Settings werden keine Helden geboren sondern Idioten entlarvt. Ich atme vorsichtig und prüfe meinen Tauchcomputer regelmäßig. Wenn sich ein Atemzug einmal länger hinauszögert und ich dann mit einem Mal kräftig am Atemregler ziehe, fliegen kleine Eiskristalle in meinen Mund und machen mir schlagartig klar wie dünn die Grenze zwischen einem guten Tauchgang und einem daramatischen Aufstieg hier ist. Freeflow heißt der Feind, der dich im Zweifelsfall sofort zum Auftauchen zwingt und in diesem Moment kann ich mir nichts schlimmeres vorstellen als diesen Tauchgang auch nur eine Sekunde früher beenden zu müssen als unbedingt notwendig.

Erlendur Bogason zeigt mir Strytan

Tauchen am Strytan

Tauchen am Strytan

Wir tauchen relativ zügig auf eine Tiefe von etwa 30-25m hinauf und beginnen langsam um den riesigen Felsen zu kreisen. Hier kann sich ein Taucher gerade noch gut hinter dem Stein verstecken, nur einige Meter tiefer könnte man einen Kleinbus unbemerkt abstellen. Strýtan ist riesig und groß und gemein. Er brodelt an allen Ecken und spuckt einem kochend heißes Wasser entgegen. An Heißwasserquellen wie diesen könnte der Ursprung für alles Leben auf diesem Planeten gelegen haben. Wissenschaftler der Universität Brekeley haben herausgefunden, dass die biochemischen Prozesse hier Leben ohne das Vorhandensein von Sonnenlicht, also ohne Photosynthese ermöglichen.

Wissenschaftler der Universität von Akureyri helfen dabei die Schlote von Strýtan zu erforschen und haben u.a. herausgefunden, dass das Wasser welches hier bei einer Temperatur von mehr als 72°C ausströmt weit über 1000 Jahre alt ist. Die Smektittürme entstanden vor über 10.000 Jahren während der letzten Eiszeit aus Magnesiumsilikaten und wuchsen seitdem Stück für Stück in Richtung Oberfläche. An ihren Rändern leben heute hunderte von Lebensformen, von Anemonen über Krebse und Fische bis hin zu Algen und Mikrobakterien. Dieser Ort ist ein Wenig wie das Galapagos Archipel der Unterwasserwelt, ein submariner Regenwald.

Tauchen am Strytan

Tauchen am Strytan

Als wir am oberen Ende des mächtigen Kegel ankommen stoppen wir kurz und prüfen unsere Instrumente. Die Luft reicht genau für den geplanten Tauchgang und wir sinken langsam wieder hinunter. Wir zirkeln um die Spitze und an allen Ecken strömt uns aus kleinen oder größeren Öffnungen heißes Wasser entgegen. Während der Rest meines Körpers im Trockenanzug gut geschützt und kuschelig warm ist, sind mir die Warmwasserquellen für meine unterkühlten Hände in den Neoprenhandschuhen mehr als willkommen. Mann muss dem Wasser etwas Zeit geben in die Handschuhe einzudringen und dabei sehr vorsichtig sein, aber dann ist die Wärmequelle mehr als angenehm.

Strytan melde bereits Besitzanspruch an

Erlendur Bogason auf dem Weg nach Unten: Strytan

Am mittleren Zubringer-Seil angekommen, starten wir unseren Aufstieg und stoppen zwei Mal. Immer schaue ich mich um, ob sich vielleicht Wale zu uns gesellt haben, doch heute war Stefania der große Star auf unseren Tauchgängen und eine Diva teilt ihren Ruhm nunmal nicht. Als wir auftauchen, unsere Ausrüstung an Bord des kleinen Bootes heben und das Seil an der Boje entfernen reißen die Wolken weiträumig auf und wir fahren durch den mit Sonnenlicht durchfluteten Fjord in Richtung des kleinen Hafen von Hjalteyri. Ich bin dankbar für den windlosen Tag, für die gute Sicht dort unten und die Sonne hier oben. Für die Möglichkeit diesen besonderen Ort gesehen zu haben und für die Aussicht darauf weitere solche Orte sehen zu dürfen.

Tauchen am Strytan

Erlendur Bogason ist der Entdecker der Kamine, Hauswart im Fjord… der Wächter der Türme. Durch seine kühle isländische Ausstrahlung ahnt man lange nicht, wie er empfindet. Die Begrüßung ist freundlich und zurückhaltend. Die Unterhaltung beginnt langsam und bleibt es lange Zeit. Während der gesamten Zeit vor dem ersten Tauchgang denke ich, ich habe hier einen typischen Einsiedler vor mir und hake eine lebendige Unterhaltung innerlich ab. Erst als wir nach dem ersten Tauchgang wieder im Boot sind und ich aufgeregt Frage, was das für ein Gefühl für ihn war diese Schlote zum ersten mal zu sehen und wie es war als er realisierte was er hier tatsächlich entdeckt hatte brechen alle Dämme. Er beginnt wie ein Wasserfall zu berichten und sein Englisch wird so zerbröckelt, dass ich gar nicht mehr hinhöre und nur noch das Funkeln in seinen Augen interpretiere. Dieser Mann ist ein Entdecker und er lebt für Momente wie diese.

Erlendur ganz in seinem Element: Tauchen in Island

Fakten zu Strýtan

  • Die Kegel entstanden vor gut 10.000 Jahren während der letzten großen Eiszeit
  • Der große Kegel hat eine Höhe von ca. 55m und fußt auf dem Meeresboden in einer Tiefe von etwa 70m
  • Das Wasser welches aus den Öffnungen austritt hat ca. 72°C und ist über 1100 Jahre alt
  • Strýtan ist die einzige hydrothermale Quelle dieser Art, die von Menschen ohne Maschinen betaucht werden kann, andere Quellen wurden nur in Tiefen von 2000 bis 6000m gefunden
  • Hydrothermale Schlote wie die in Strýtan könnten die Quelle allen Lebens auf dieser Erde sein, da sich an diesen Leben in Abwesenheit von Sonnenlicht entwickeln kann
  • Die Existenz der Kamine wurde schon vor vielen Jahren angenommen, eine Expedition im Fjord ergab aber keine Ergebnisse und so wurden sie von den offiziellen Karten wieder entfernt. Erlendur fand die Kamine wenige Jahre später nach einem Hinweis von einem lokalen Fischer
  • Manchmal nimmt Erlendur eine Thermoskanne mit hinunter um sie mit heißem Wasser aus den Kaminen zu befüllen und oben im Boot heiße Schokolade zu zaubern